A Rainy Day Muskoka Engagement Session with Haley & Joe

Haley & Joe met me in Muskoka for their engagement session at the family cottage this fall.  None of us were expecting quite how freezing cold the rain and driving winds would be when we got there, but without a moment's hesitation they were ready to take off their coats and stand at the end of windy docks for the sake of a good photograph.  I love all of my gung-ho clients!  Between multiple trips dashing back to the cars to warm ourselves up and dry my lenses out, we created some fabulous photographs of their engagement in beautiful Ontario Cottage Country in the fall, rain, wind, and all. 

Toronto Island Waterfront Wedding

Kyla and Skylar were married on the beautiful waterfront of the Toronto Islands.  Their ceremony combined both their New Brunswick and Toronto roots perfectly.  It had a small and relaxed east coast vibe, with the CN tower and Toronto skyline stretching up in the background behind a beautiful arch of summer greenery.  Kyla is co-owner of a sustainably sourced vintage fashion company, and her amazing sense of style shone through every detail of their wedding.  From her stylish two piece wedding dress and gold gladiator sandals, to the suspenders worn by the groomsmen (who doesn't love suspenders???), to the simple crowns of greenery worn by the bridesmaids, every detail was perfect together!

The flower crowns, ceremony archway, bouquet, and boutonniers were all made by Wildernis Florals, a Collingwood based wedding florist and co-owner of Kyla's fashion company Copper Collective .

Toronto Waterfront Bridal Style

I'm so excited to finally share more photos from this beautiful styled bridal shoot, conceived and created along with Amy from Bridal Hair collective, and pulled off with an amazing team of Toronto and surrounding area vendors.  Our Scarborough Bluffs wedding shoot was featured on The Wedding Co. blog last week, and you can follow the link here to see more photos of our work from that day.  The feature highlighted the natural bridal beauty aesthetic we created, from our bride's bare feet, to the leaves in her hair and minimal makeup complementing her natural beauty and features, to the simple and elegant Saja wedding dress.  The soft and romantic dress fit beautifully with the beach-y venue as the layers blew gently in the breeze, and the off-white colour suited the blue and grey pastels of the beach and cliffs.  Her bouquet was made of wild-foraged greenery accented with stunning pops of white flowers that our creative floral artist arranged to create a wild and free feeling, with big branches, flowing ribbons, and beautifully unconventional greenery.  The feature also highlighted one of the many beautiful and little known areas around Toronto where you can escape to take stunning natural wedding photos if you're getting married in the city. 

Take a look through our shoot, and be sure to get in touch with any of the vendors listed below if, like me, you absolutely love their work here!

Photography: Corynn Fowler Photography
Hair Styling: Bridal Hair Collective
Makeup: Katie Marie Bridal
Florals: Ashley Elaine
Dress: Saja from Sash and Bustle
Jewellery: Hattitude Jewellery
Model: Clare from B&M

 

Shooting Film: An Introduction

Last year I decided that I was going to begin incorporating some good old fashioned film photography into my professional wedding work.  I love everything about film.  The colours, the textures, the way film reads light differently from my digital sensor, the thought and time that goes into planning each film shot, I was (and still am) absolutely infatuated with every aspect of being a fine-art wedding photographer.   So, in the fall I started getting the ball in motion to move my business in this direction.  So far, it hasn't been an entirely easy process, so for the sake of both my own reflection and helping anyone else who is interested in moving towards film, I've decided to write about what I'm learning along the way.

I'm a meticulous planner, organizer, and maker of 'Pro's and Con's' lists.  I spent countless hours researching and agonizing over minute details between camera bodies and film stocks, lens coatings and light meters.  I finally went out and bought my first medium format film camera, a gorgeously restored old Hasselblad 500CM with a zeiss lens; and 50 rolls of film, fuji 400 colour in 120 format.   This used up a significant portion of my savings, so my camera then sat in a heavily padded bag for several months, emerging only to be photographed by my digital camera.  Ironically.  I was too scared to start shooting with it and risk 'wasting' money on developing rolls that didn't work out.

Eventually, I realized that I would have to start shooting with my new investment in order to actually learn how to use medium format film, so I started researching how to shoot properly.  Somehow, in all my hours of camera body research, I had neglected to look up how to actually USE my camera.  I found out that colour film can create all kinds of different 'looks' based on how it's shot and processed, so I turned to the pro's at Richard Photo Lab to teach me all about pushing and pulling film, light conditions, and how I can create my own personal film aesthetic through working with them. 

To start with, the Richard Photo Lab blog is fantastic and I learned so much just by spending an afternoon scrolling through their posts.  I definitely recommend checking out their blog next if you're interested in using film.  On top of that, they've been fabulously helpful chatting with me by email about learning to shoot film.  They're based in California, so with foreign exchange and shipping it's been a bit pricey to develop my rolls with them, but to work with a lab whose work I consistently like, and who have been endlessly helpful to me as a learning resource, it's been well worth it!

Below are some of my first rolls of 120 film I shot.  I created these images at a styled shoot, which was the perfect place to get started.  I could work at my own pace without any of the external pressures of a wedding day, but I also HAD to shoot some rolls because the other vendors involved were keen to see it in action.  I'm happy with some of the results, and not so happy with others.  I still have a lot to learn about using my camera smoothly, and a long way to go to know how my film with react to different light, (to be honest I'm even still learning how to use my light meter properly), BUT I can't wait to shoot my next rolls of film and keep working towards shooting professionally with my Hasselblad (aka learning how to keep track of my dark slide).

xo
C